super bowl cbd commercial

Baristas Coffee Company promoted their new CBD-infused EnrichaRoast coffee to fans who attended the Super Bowl yesterday at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. The ads were delivered on mobile devices used by fans who were at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. According to Baristas, ads for their coffee were seen on over 50,000 digital screens during the Super Bowl.

Marijuana advocates were outraged a few weeks ago when it was revealed that CBS rejected a Super Bowl commercial that promoted medical marijuana. But it turns out that doesn’t mean the Super Bowl was entirely cannabis-free.

Obviously, an ad that can only be seen on cell phones by people who are physically attending the Super Bowl does not compare to an actual Super Bowl commercial that will be seen by the over 100 million people watching the game on TV. But it does now set a precedent for the Super Bowl being connected to marijuana-related advertising. So perhaps in future years, the network in charge of the Super Bowl will be more accepting of a cannabis commercial.

Interested in getting some athletes’ insights, Entrepreneur reached out to Treyous Jarrells, a former Colorado State running back who had to quit football so that he could continue to medicate with cannabis, and has since become a vocal cannabis advocate and entrepreneur. “I’m a huge activist when it comes to the cannabis space, but I see why CBS rejected this ad, being that it’s tied to the NFL… Knowing what we know about how cannabis is viewed when it comes to professional sports, especially football, it only makes sense that the ad was rejected; the NFL still views cannabis as a banned substance.”

As an award-winning reporter and editor, Javier's had roughly 5,000 unique articles published across numerous mass media outlets including CNN, Forbes, MSN, Chicago Tribune, CNBC, Yahoo Finance, Entrepreneur Magazine, MarketWatch, Houston Chronicle, The Street, Nasdaq, Morningstar, Playboy, Benzinga, MERRY JANE, High Times, and many others.

The Footage

Perhaps unsurprisingly, considering that cannabis remains illegal on the federal level under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, CBS rejected the ad. A network spokesperson told USA Today that, for the time being, pot-related ads did not fit CBS’ broadcast standards.

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The ad opens with Austin, a young man suffering a seizure caused by epilepsy. His mother, Amy Bourlon-Hilterban, from Florence, Colorado, explains that “Austin would have dozens to hundreds of seizures every single day,” and that prescription medications were not working.