how does cbd help ptsd

How does cbd help ptsd

CB1 receptors occur throughout the entire body, with the highest concentrations in the brain and the central nervous system. The indirect activation of CB1 and serotonin receptors through the use of CBD can result in reduced anxiety, better sleep, stable mood, and increased alertness.

CBD and PTSD: Research Studies

For example, CBD uses the same mechanism of action as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (7). Current evidence suggests that CBD has a positive effect on the brain’s serotonin concentrations. Serotonin is a natural neurotransmitter that helps to regulate mood on top of many other things. Low levels of serotonin are associated with depression and low mood. While CBD doesn’t directly stimulate the production of serotonin, studies suggest that it may alter the activity of serotonin receptors — helping to process the brain’s existing levels of serotonin more efficiently.

How to Use CBD for PTSD

As mentioned earlier in the article, finding the right product for your needs may take some time. There are hundreds of brands on the market, each of them claiming to sell the best CBD oil for a wide range of conditions, including PTSD. Of course, the market is full of great companies that make high-quality products at affordable prices, but there’s an equal number of manufacturers who don’t bother churning out poor quality products that are mislabeled and sometimes downright dangerous.

Characteristics of the study sample are presented in Table 1 . The average age of the population in this study was 39.91 (range: 22–69, n = 11). The majority (73%, n = 8) of patients were female. On average, patients were concurrently taking three psychiatric medications, including antidepressants, mood stabilizers, anxiolytics, and stimulants. One patient used cannabis daily throughout the study. Overall, 73% (n = 8) of patients were concurrently receiving psychotherapy as part of their overall care. Patients had on average 1.8 comorbid psychiatric conditions in addition to their PTSD diagnosis, including anxiety, mood, personality, and sleep disorders.

This article describes a retrospective chart review of adult psychiatric patients with a diagnosis of PTSD who consented to treatment with CBD as augmentation to routine psychiatric treatment at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. All current patients with a diagnosis of PTSD were considered for treatment with CBD between February 2016 and May 2018. Patients were not excluded based on the presence of other psychiatric comorbidities (aside from an active thought disorder) or concurrent use of cannabis. The diagnosis of PTSD was established through clinical evaluation by a mental health professional (psychiatrist, psychiatric nurse practitioner, or physician assistant). Inclusion criteria for the present analysis required a cut-off score of 33 on the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for the DSM-5 (PCL-5) 19 and a minimum of two consecutive follow-up appointments after the initial intake appointment. The final sample consisted of 11 adult patients with a diagnosis of PTSD and who met inclusion criteria.

3 School of Social Work, Colorado State University College of Health and Human Sciences, Fort Collins, CO.

2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO.

Sample

Four patients received CBD as an oral capsule only. One patient only received CBD in the form of an oral liquid spray. Fifty-five percent (n = 6) of patients received both forms of CBD either concurrently or sequentially over the course of the study. The form of CBD (capsule vs. liquid spray) was determined by provider and patient preference. The CBD products used in this study were supplied by CV Sciences. Capsules were demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) to contain 22–28 mg of CBD per capsule. Patients were instructed to take whole capsules, which were assumed to contain 25 mg of CBD for dosing purposes. Patients were instructed to take liquid CBD as a specified number of sprays from a spray bottle. The liquid product used in this article was demonstrated by HPLC-UV to contain between 425 and 575 mg of CBD in total per bottle, equating to about 1.5 mg of CBD per spray.

The hypothesis of this study was that patients with DSM-5-diagnosed PTSD who were administered CBD along with routine psychiatric care would show a decrease in PTSD-specific symptomatology. This hypothesis was based on prior rodent and limited human studies that suggest that (1) CBD may cause decreased response to and increased extinction of aversive memories, and that (2) CBD may have an anxiolytic effect, which, in turn, would have therapeutic value in patients with PTSD. To this end, we conducted a retrospective file review of adult patients with PTSD who were treated with CBD as part of standard psychiatric care in an outpatient clinic. The goal of this review was to examine the tolerability of CBD and its effectiveness in PTSD symptom reduction.

Results: From the total sample of 11 patients, 91% (n = 10) experienced a decrease in PTSD symptom severity, as evidenced by a lower PCL-5 score at 8 weeks than at their initial baseline. The mean total PCL-5 score decreased 28%, from a mean baseline score of 51.82 down to 37.14, after eight consecutive weeks of treatment with CBD. CBD was generally well tolerated, and no patients discontinued treatment due to side effects.

Materials and Methods

Patients were instructed to take CBD once or twice per day based on severity of symptoms. The median starting oral capsular dose was 25 mg per day (range: 25–100). The median dose of liquid CBD given throughout the study was 9 mg per day (range: 1–16). The mean total starting dose of CBD (liquid or capsular or both) was 33.18 mg (standard deviation [SD] = 23.34). The mean total dose of CBD prescribed at the 8-week follow-up appointment at the conclusion of the study period was 48.64 mg (range: 2–100). The dose of CBD was adjusted at each 4-week appointment based on the patient’s presentation and experience. Most patients received an increase in the dose of CBD because treatment was provided to maximize PTSD symptom reduction, which seemed to be directly correlated with dose. These doses are much lower than the doses used in the previous clinical literature for multiple reasons. The first is that lower doses appear to elicit an adequate clinical response in our experience. Second, the current retail cost of CBD would make the use of 600 mg per day cost-prohibitive. Finally, doses for the liquid spray route of administration are typically lower than that of capsules and are usually measured as single milligrams of CBD per spray, thus rendering higher doses impractical for patients relying on liquid CBD.

Objectives: Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic cannabinoid compound that is found in plants of the genus Cannabis. Preclinical research has suggested that CBD may have a beneficial effect in rodent models of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This effect is believed to be due to the action of CBD on the endocannabinoid system. CBD has seen a recent surge in research regarding its potential value in a number of neuro-psychiatric conditions. This is the first study to date examining the clinical benefit of CBD for patients with PTSD.