cbd receptors in the body

Cbd receptors in the body

Review Figure 1 and the steps below to take a closer look at the components of the EC system, how it works, and the effects of THC.

Brain cells (neurons) communicate with each other and with the rest of the body by sending chemical “messages.” These messages help coordinate and regulate everything we feel, think, and do. Typically, the chemicals (called neurotransmitters) are released from a neuron (a presynaptic cell), travel across a small gap (the synapse), and then attach to specific receptors located on a nearby neuron (postsynaptic cell). This spurs the receiving neuron into action, triggering a set of events that allows the message to be passed along.

Figure 1: The Endocannabinoid (EC) System and THC

The endocannabinoid system consists of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), cannabinoid receptors and the enzymes that synthesise and degrade endocannabinoids. Many of the effects of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids are mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), CB(1) and CB(2), although additional receptors may be involved. CB(1) receptors are present in very high levels in several brain regions and in lower amounts in a more widespread fashion. These receptors mediate many of the psychoactive effects of cannabinoids. CB(2) receptors have a more restricted distribution, being found in a number of immune cells and in a few neurones. Both CB(1) and CB(2) couple primarily to inhibitory G proteins and are subject to the same pharmacological influences as other GPCRs. Thus, partial agonism, functional selectivity and inverse agonism all play important roles in determining the cellular response to specific cannabinoid receptor ligands.

Cbd receptors in the body

CB1R has been found to inhibit GABA and glutamate release from presynaptic terminals, which confers the CB1R with the ability to modulate neurotransmission [60,129]. This has been proposed as a plausible underlying mechanism of CB1R-mediated neuroprotection against excitotoxicity, a prominent pathological process of many neurological disorders, including epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases [34,130,131]. To date, numerous studies have shown that the CB1R plays a neuroprotective role against excitotoxicity induced by various stimuli [131,132,133,134]. It has been demonstrated recently that in mouse brain, the neuroprotective effect exerted by CB1R against excitotoxicity is restricted to the CB1R population located on glutamatergic terminals [130]. In addition to the prominent inhibitory effects on Ca 2+ influx and glutamate release, CB1R-mediated neuroprotection also involves inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production, reduction of zinc mobilization, and increase of BDNF expression [134,135,136]. Recent studies have implicated a direct physical interaction between CB1Rs and NMDARs in the presence of histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1, which allows CB1Rs to negatively regulate NMDAR activity and protects neural cells from excitotoxicity [136,137].

Simplified scheme representing endocannabinoid retrograde signaling mediated synaptic transmission. Endocannabinoids are produced from postsynaptic terminals upon neuronal activation. As the two major endocannabinoids shown in the scheme, 2-arachidonolglycerol (2-AG) is biosynthesized from diacylglycerol (DAG) by diacylglycerol lipase-α (DAGLα), and anandamide (AEA) is synthesized from N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) by NAPE-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD). As lipids, endocannabinoids, mainly 2-AG, readily cross the membrane and travel in a retrograde fashion to activate CB1Rs located in the presynaptic terminals. Activated CB1Rs will then inhibit neurotransmitter (NT) release through the suppression of calcium influx. 2-AG is also able to activate CB1Rs located in astrocytes, leading to the release of glutamate. Extra 2-AG in the synaptic cleft is taken up into the presynaptic terminals, via a yet unclear mechanism, and degraded to arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). On the other hand, AEA, synthesized in postsynaptic terminal, activates intracellular CB1R and other non-CBR targets, such as the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Although endocannabinoid retrograde signaling is mainly mediated by 2-AG, AEA can activate presynaptic CB1Rs as well. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is primarily found in postsynaptic terminals and is responsible for degrading AEA to AA and ethanolamine (EtNH2). Although NAPE-PLD is expressed in presynaptic terminals in several brain regions, it is not clear yet whether AEA is responsible for anterograde signaling in the endocannabinoid system. Note that alternative routes exist for the metabolism of endocannabinoids, depending on the brain region and physiological conditions. Thin arrows indicate enzymatic process; thick arrows indicate translocation; blunted arrow indicates inhibition.

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Due to the lipophilic nature of cannabinoids, it was initially thought that these compounds exert various biological effects by disrupting the cell membrane nonspecifically. However, following the discovery of THC and subsequent emerging of several chemically synthesized cannabinoids, the successful mapping and the pharmacological characterization of cannabinoid binding sites in the brain revealed the existence of a putative CBR and its similarity to GPCR nature, which was matched with the properties of an orphan GPCR that is now known as CB1R [4,5,6,7,18].

7. Physiological and Pathological Roles of the CB1R

Major localization sites and associated functions of the CB1R in the human body. The majority of CB1Rs expressed in human body is found in the brain, where it is involved in various neurological activities. CB1Rs on the peripheral sites, although to a lesser extent, participates in the regulation of local tissue functions.

Moreover, the CB1R modulates the activity of several types of ion channels [88,94]. CB1Rs have been reported to inhibit N-type Ca 2+ channel in neuroblastoma cell lines, in cultured rat primary hippocampal neurons, and in mice cerebellar slices [95,96,97,98]. It has long been suggested, but proved only recently, that the CB1R regulates Ca 2+ influx to inhibit γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release in mouse hippocampal slices via modulation of the activity of presynaptic N-type Ca 2+ channel [99]. Other types of Ca 2+ channels, including P/Q-type, and R-type Ca 2+ channels, have been shown to be negatively regulated by CB1R in various systems [95,96,100,101]. On the other hand, the CB1R regulates the activity of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K + channels (GIRKs) as well [101,102,103]. The CB1R activates GIRK in transfected AtT-20 cells, mouse nucleus accumbens slices, and rat sympathetic neurons injected with CB1R complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) [101,102,103].

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CB1R-modulated major signaling pathways. Typically, the CB1R is coupled to Gi/o and inhibits the activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC), formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and the activity of protein kinase A (PKA). Under certain circumstances, the CB1R can switch its coupling of G protein from Gi/o to Gs or Gq. The CB1R is able to suppress calcium influx via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC). Several mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including ERK1/2, p38, and JNK, are activated by the CB1R. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway is activated by CB1R as well. Depending on the ligand and subcellular environment, the outcome of CB1R-mediated signaling could be promotion of cell survival or cell death. Arrows indicate stimulation; blunted arrows indicate inhibition.

2. Cannabinoid Receptors

The regulation of pain is one of the earliest medical applications of cannabinoids [1,2]. Numerous studies have documented the analgesic effects of cannabinoids in different types of pain, including chemical, mechanical, and heat pain, as well as neuropathic, inflammatory, and cancer pain [172,173]. The endocannabinoid system also is involved in the regulation of nociception [3]. A newly published review paper has discussed the preclinical and clinical studies on the role of endocannabinoids in the control of inflammatory and neuropathic pain in details [173]. In addition to the CB1R, there also is evidence supporting the involvement of the CB2R and TRPV1 in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of pain [174,175]. Furthermore, the phytocannabinoids have drawn much attention nowadays in the field of antinociception and other neurological disorders. CBD, for instance, has been shown to modulate chronic pain in several studies [173]. The drug with brand name Sativex, containing equal amount of THC and CBD, is used to treat several kinds of multiple sclerosis associated symptoms including chronic pain [176]. Despite the fact that CBD has negligible affinity to the CB1R and CB2R, recent studies have suggested that it is an allosteric modulator and an indirect antagonist of CBRs, with the ability to potentiate the effect of THC [177].

Specifically, altered expression of the CB1R and other elements of the endocannabinoid system have been observed in various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) [3]. The upregulation of the CB1R and endocannabinoid system activity has been observed in the basal ganglia of experimental models of PD, which could be a mechanism to compensate the degenerated dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, or a pathological process that contributes to the worsening of the disease [138]. Interestingly, decreased endocannabinoid system activity has also been reported in PD models [128]. Moreover, both the FAAH inhibitors and CB1R antagonists have been shown to alleviate the motor symptoms in PD models [128]. Similarly, although changes of CB1R expression in AD patients or animal models are still controversial, the activation of the CB1R has been shown to prevent amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity in several cell models [139,140,141,142,143,144]. In addition, the activation of the CB1R has been reported to be beneficial in AD animal models with memory deficits and cognitive disorders [145,146,147]. On the other hand, studies have emphasized the beneficial potentials of the CB1R in HD pathogenesis. In 1993, decreased expression of the CB1R was first reported in the substantia nigra of HD patients via autoradiography [148]. Further studies revealed a progressive loss of CB1Rs as an early sign of HD, which occurred before the onset of actual neurodegeneration, and hastened the worsening of HD [149]. This observation was confirmed at the mRNA level as well as with CB1R immunoreactivity in several transgenic HD mouse models (reviewed in [3]). A recent study described downregulation of the CB1R not only in medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) but also in a subpopulation of interneurons that are selectively preserved in both transgenic HD mice and HD patients [150]. Delayed loss of CB1Rs in HD transgenic mice R6/1 was seen in enriched environment, accompanied by delayed onset of motor disorders and disease progression [151]. Moreover, in HD transgenic mice R6/2, CB1R knockout leads to the worsening of motor performances, increased susceptibility to 3-nitropropionic acid, and exacerbated striatal atrophy and Huntingtin (Htt) aggregates [133,152]. Selective increase in CB1R expression in MSNs improves the survival of excitatory projection neurons, but does not promote the motor performances of HD transgenic R6/2 mice [153]. Administration of THC has been reported to ameliorate motor disorders, striatal atrophy, and Htt aggregates in transgenic mice, although controversy exists [133,154]. Activation of the CB1R inhibits glutamate release while increases BDNF release from presynaptic terminals in mice [131]. Further investigation in HD cell models revealed that CB1R activation can protect striatal cells against excitotoxicity through increased BDNF expression via PI3K/Akt pathway [133]. These observations support a critical and possibly beneficial role of the CB1R in neurodegenerative diseases.

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