cbd oil for tension headaches

Cbd oil for tension headaches

It is important to remember that cannabis is a plant. It contains a variety of compounds that are linked to decreasing the effects of tension headaches. Namely, this includes tetrahydrocannabinol or THC and cannabidiol or CBD. Both of these compounds will work with the CB1 And CB2 receptors that are present within the body.

If you are someone that suffers from a lot of tension headaches, you may be looking for a quick way to prevent the symptoms. For instance, some people try meditation or take painkillers that you can get from the local store. Unfortunately, these methods do not work for everyone and you may be growing tired of the constant headaches.

If you suffer from tension headaches, you’ll know how debilitating they can be. While they might not stop you from going to work or carrying out certain activities, they can cloud your thinking and make you feel uncomfortable and you’ve probably explored many ways to prevent your tension headaches or lessen their symptoms.

In particular, there are two types of tension headaches to be aware of. The episodic tension headache is one that you experience fewer than 15 days every month. They often build throughout the day and are worse at night. Chronic tension headaches are headaches that you experience more than 15 times in a month. You may find that the pain is more intense and that it is there constantly throughout the day.

What is a Tension Headache?

First of all, it is important to recognise that there are many different types of headaches. When you understand the headache you have, you can figure out the best way you can prevent your symptoms.

When doing your research, you may have come across cannabis products and discovered links to help relieve the pain of headaches. Indeed, this is something that should be explored as it may be beneficial for you.

A tension headache or a stress headache is when you experience a dull pain or pressure on the back of your head or forehead. It is very common for adults with busy lifestyles and difficult careers to suffer from tension headaches. They are often described as a squeezing pain or like something is tightening around your head. They do not normally stop you from your daily activities but they can be irritating and an inconvenience. Tension headaches should not affect your balance or vision. Other symptoms can include tiredness but trouble sleeping, problems with concentration and irritability.

However, you may be interested to learn if cannabis or medical marijuana can help with your tension headaches. Indeed, there has been research and trials to suggest that it can be beneficial to take cannabis for tension headaches . This can be from stopping them from occurring in the first place to helping to reduce the discomfort from which you suffer as a result of the headache pain.

Historical Reports of the Use of Cannabis as a Treatment for Headache (19th and Early 20th Century)

Headache disorders are common, debilitating, and, in many cases, inadequately managed by existing treatments. Although clinical trials of cannabis for neuropathic pain have shown promising results, there has been limited research on its use, specifically for headache disorders. This review considers historical prescription practices, summarizes the existing reports on the use of cannabis for headache, and examines the preclinical literature exploring the role of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids to alter headache pathophysiology. Currently, there is not enough evidence from well-designed clinical trials to support the use of cannabis for headache, but there are sufficient anecdotal and preliminary results, as well as plausible neurobiological mechanisms, to warrant properly designed clinical trials. Such trials are needed to determine short- and long-term efficacy for specific headache types, compatibility with existing treatments, optimal administration practices, as well as potential risks.

Historical reports, though not ideal forms of evidence, are important resources for understanding the potential use of cannabis in the treatment of headache disorders. Clinical publications between 1839 and 1937 provide valuable insights into the most effective practices, challenges, and benefits during an era when cannabis was commonly used to treat headache. A summary of historical treatment practices using cannabis for migraines can be seen in Table 1 . Historical sources indicate that cannabis was used as an effective prophylactic and abortive treatment for headache disorders. Although dosing varied among physicians, most prescribed alcohol extractions of the drug in the range of ¼ to ½ grain (16–32 mg). 28,32,36–40 This dose was likely chosen to minimize the effects of intoxication while also providing effective therapeutic relief. Other providers suggested that doses should be progressively increased until modest effects of intoxication were felt. 19 For prophylactic treatment, these doses were usually administered two to three times daily for weeks or even months. 28,32,36–38 Acute treatment often involved higher doses taken as needed and, in some cases, smoked cannabis was recommended. 19,41–42

Table 1.

The reintroduction of cannabis to the West in 1839 25 began a century of its use as an effective treatment for headache disorders 26 until its illegalization in 1937. 27 Notable physicians who espoused the benefits of cannabis for headache disorders included John Russell Reynolds, the personal physician of Queen Victoria, 28 American neurologist Silas Weir Mitchell, 29 the president of the New York Neurological Society Edouard C. Seguin, 19 William Gowers, a founding father of modern neurology, 30 and Sir William Osler, often considered the father of modern medicine. 31

The schedule 1 classification of marijuana in 1970 has made rigorous clinical studies on the treatment efficacy of this substance difficult. Currently, there are no placebo-controlled clinical studies examining the use of cannabis for headache; nevertheless, there have been a number of other studies published that give insight into its therapeutic efficacy ( Table 2 ). 19,43–58 However, care should be taken when interpreting the findings from these studies. With one exception, 53 these studies did not include a control group, and given that the placebo effect can be altered by the context of treatment, 59 it is reasonable to expect a significant placebo response given the pre-existing public popularity and notoriety of cannabis. Moreover, self-reports and case studies may have a bias toward immediate improvement without awareness of possible dependence, rebound, or withdrawal responses, which are important concerns in headache treatment. 60 In fact, studies show that headache can be induced in 23.2% patients undergoing cannabis withdrawal. 61

Introduction

The pathophysiology of headache disorders is still under investigation. However, it is believed that migraine and cluster headaches are initiated in the brain in areas such as the hypothalamus, brainstem, or possibly cortex. 6 Tension-type headaches can not only originate in the central nervous system but may also be triggered by myofascial tissue, often developing in response to stress. 10 Regardless of origin, headaches usually involve overactivation of the trigeminovascular pathway, resulting in the release of vasoactive peptides, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P, as well as vasoactive mediators such as nitrous oxide (NO), which can lead to further sensitization of nociceptive receptors in the head and neck. 11 Serotoninergic signaling, parasympathetic efferents, inflammation, and increased intracranial pressure also play important roles in headache disorders. 12,13

The present review has four unique aims: (1) Highlight common historical trends in the use of cannabis in the treatment of headache to inform future clinical guidelines. (2) Briefly present the current clinical literature on this topic, with a focus on more recent publications that have not been discussed in past reviews. (3) Compile various preclinical studies into a prospective integrated model outlining the role of cannabinoids in the modulation of headache pathogenesis. (4) Outline several 19,32–35 future directions that warrant exploration based on the limited, but promising findings on this topic.

Cbd oil for tension headaches

Studies on the effects of CBD oil for Headache treatment are limited, and like many new treatments, there is no standard dose or recommended treatment method for everyone.

While analgesics can temporarily relieve migraine symptoms, their side effects are troubling with extended use. This is where CBD oil (cannabidiol) comes in.

CBD products does not alter your mind or inhibit your daily function, but comes with a host of benefits!

Cluster Headache

Based on widespread anecdotal evidence only, the standard CBD dosage recommendation may depend on your body weight. Start with 1 to 6 mg for every 10 pounds of body weight.

Abortive medications stop headache progression, while preventive drugs prevent them before they happen. Examples of abortive are NSAIDs and acetaminophen.

Everyone, at some point in their life, has experienced a tension headache because it is one of the most common ailments. But what causes this type of headache? Several reasons are responsible for this condition. For example, a simple throat irritation can be a starting point of a migraine.

What is a Tension Headache?

Nutrition: Your diet and sensitivity to foods are some of the leading causes of head pain, especially migraines.

CBD oil can be used to relieve your symptoms: