cbd for hip and back pain

Cbd for hip and back pain

While there are laboratory studies suggesting CBD might be a promising approach, and animal studies showing anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving effects, well-designed studies demonstrating compelling evidence that CBD is safe and effective for chronic arthritis pain in humans do not exist. A randomized trial of topical CBD for osteoarthritis of the knee has been published, but in abstract form only (meaning it’s a preliminary report that summarizes the trial and has not been thoroughly vetted yet); the trial lasted only 12 weeks, and results were mixed at best. One of the largest reviews examined the health effects of cannabis and CBD, and concluded that there is “substantial evidence that cannabis is an effective treatment for chronic pain in adults.” But there was no specific conclusion regarding CBD, presumably because definitive studies were not available.

There’s a good chance you’ve tried it already: according to a Gallup poll in August of 2019, about 14% of Americans report using CBD products, and the number one reason is pain. The Arthritis Foundation conducted its own poll and found that 29% reported current use of CBD (mostly in liquid or topical form), and nearly 80% of respondents were either using it, had used it in the past, or were considering it. Of those using it, most reported improvement in physical function, sleep, and well-being; of note, a minority reported improvement in pain or stiffness.

Are there downsides to CBD treatment?

But now, there is.

We may not have all the evidence we’d like, but if CBD can safely improve your symptoms, it may be worth considering.

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A word about arthritis pain

Until recently, little guidance has been available for people with arthritis pain who were interested in CBD treatment. Depending on availability and interest, patients and their doctors had to decide on their own whether CBD was a reasonable option in each specific case. To a large degree that’s still true, but some guidelines have been published. Here’s one set of guidelines for people pursuing treatment with CBD that I find quite reasonable (based on recommendations from the Arthritis Foundation and a recent commentary published in the medical journal Arthritis Care & Research):

Advocates of CBD believe it can be used to treat a range of conditions in addition to back pain, such as anxiety-related disorders. 5

Cannabidiol, even in high amounts, is generally safe. Side effects from CBD may include:

CBD oil is derived from a plant called cannabis sativa. The plant has over 100 chemical compounds, called cannabinoids, that have a range of effects, including anti-inflammatory and analgesic (pain relieving) qualities.

Potential Risks and Side Effects of CBD

CBD is available in many forms; topical creams and gels have shown promising results for inflammation and neuropathy, which may make them a good option for back and neck pain. 2

More severe side effects, while rare, include:

Research indicates that CBD may reduce back pain by:

Ways CBD Treats Back Pain

The cannabis sativa plant has two main varieties that are grown for specific purposes:

While CBD is present in both varieties, many of the CBD products available to consumers are from the hemp plant. CBD does not come with the high or psychogenic effects of marijuana.

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Two-hundred consecutive patients presenting with painful hip or knee OA were surveyed at their initial evaluation at a large academic center. Using Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores, survey questions assessed perceived pain and effectiveness of CBD products, in addition to other nonsurgical treatment modalities. Chart review provided demographic factors. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the data.

Methods:

SANE and VAS Scores Among Non-CBD and CBD Users, Respectively

Table 1

Among non-CBD users, 73% had tried NSAIDs for symptomatic relief compared with 90% among the CBD using group. A statistically higher percentage of patients in the CBD group had used NSAIDs for symptomatic relief compared with non-CBD users (P = 0.017). No significant difference was found in the number of patients who had tried bracing treatment, steroid injections, or viscosupplementation injections between the two groups. A significantly higher percentage of marijuana use was found among the CBD group compared with non-CBD users (31% versus 1%, respectively, P < 0.001) despite similar rates of “Other” recreational drug use (15% CBD users versus 11% non-CBD users) (Table ​ (Table3 3 ).