December 18, 2017

:

Cannabis-infused wine claims to give you a buzz — without the hangover -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Los Angeles (Finally) Passes Cannabis Business Regulations -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Coffee Shop Wants to Be Denver’s First Legal Cannabis Club -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Yes, you’ll be able to smoke weed legally in three weeks. But here are hard realities -

Sunday, December 10, 2017

5 Cannabis Products Changing the Way We Think About Marijuana -

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Study: Alcohol Sales Fall Following Cannabis Legalization -

Friday, December 1, 2017

California Weed Entrepreneurs Will Make $5.2B In 2018 With Almost No Banks To Put It In -

Monday, November 27, 2017

Pot For Pets? Experts Say Cannabis Can Ease Pain In Animals As Well -

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

A fast-growing cannabis tech company just raised $10 million in a bid to dominate the market -

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Why are Hemp Farmers Fed Up with Federal Seed Laws? -

Saturday, August 29, 2015

The Medical Minute: These Researchers are Developing a Weight Loss Medicine with Cannabis -

Friday, August 28, 2015

What Would a Trump Presidency Mean For Cannabis? -

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Oregon Court of Appeals Doesn’t Find the Smell of Cannabis Smoke to Be “Unpleasant” -

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Government-Run Cancer Institute Quietly Acknowledges That Cannabis Kills Cancer Cells -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Why Did This Pro Video Gaming League Ban Cannabis? -

Monday, August 24, 2015

4 Good Budtender Habits that Make for a Positive Customer Experience -

Saturday, August 22, 2015

If a Wildfire Spreads to a Cannabis Field, Can You Get High from It? -

Friday, August 21, 2015

8 Ways to Counteract a Too-Intense Cannabis High -

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Florida Keeps Fighting for Medical Marijuana: The Leafly Cannabis Legalization Roundup -

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Weekend Weirdness: Pigeon Caught Trying to Smuggle Cannabis into a Costa Rican Prison -

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Research Team Finds How CBD, a Component in Marijuana, Works Within Cells

The findings published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry could provide a new basis for developing CBD-based treatments for pediatric epilepsy

Newswise — STONY BROOK, N.Y., February 11, 2015 – A team of Stony Brook University researchers have identified fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) as intracellular transporters for two ingredients in marijuana, THC and CBD (cannabidiol). The finding, published early online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, is significant because it helps explain how CBD works within the cells. Recent clinical findings have shown that CBD may help reduce seizures and could be a potential new medicine to treat pediatric treatment-resistant epilepsy.

CBD differs from THC in that it is not psychoactive and does not bind to cannabinoid receptors. Some children who are resistant to conventional antiepileptic drugs have been reported to show improvement with oral CBD treatment. The Stony Brook research team found that three brain FABPs carry THC and CBD from the cell membrane to the interior of the cell. This action enabled them to conduct experiments inhibiting FABPs and thereby reducing anandamide breakdown inside the cells.

“Anandamide, an endocannabinoid, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects against seizures in basic research studies and this may turn out to be a key mechanism of seizure control,” explained Dale Deutsch, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and a faculty member of the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery at Stony Brook University. “Therefore by CBD inhibiting FABPs, we could potentially raise the levels of anandamide in the brain’s synapses.”

The findings in the paper, titled “Fatty Acid Binding Proteins are Intracellular Carriers for THC and CBD,” stem from the team’s research that spans five years and includes their discoveries that showed anandamide levels were raised in rodent brains using novel drugs targeted to FABPs. In 2013, they received a $3.8 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to target endocannabinoid transporters to develop drugs for pain and inflammation.

The current research involving FABPs as transporters of CBD involves the work of faculty and students from several Stony Brook Departments. The team includes four Professors – Dr. Deutsch, Martin Kaczocha (Anesthesiology), Iwao Ojima (Chemistry and the Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery), and Stella Tsirka (Pharmacological Sciences). The team also features a post-doctoral fellow (Jeremy Miyauchi in Pharmacological Sciences), a researcher who recently received his PhD (William Berger in Chemistry), a graduate student Matthew Elmes, a research technician Liqun Wang, and undergraduate students Brian Ralph, Kwan-Knok Leung, and Joseph Sweeney, all from the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

SOURCE = http://www.newswise.com/articles/research-team-finds-how-cbd-a-component-in-marijuana-works-within-cells

Comments are closed.